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Filtration

Key Stage 2

ProductFiltration.png

Meaning

Filtering is when you separate liquid from insoluble solids.

Noun: Filtration
Verb: To filter
Present Participle: Filtering
Adjective: Filtered

About Filtering

Filtering cannot separate anything dissolved in a liquid.
When you filter the solid will get stuck in the filter paper and the liquid will pass through.

Examples

MuddyPuddle.png
You can separate mud from water in the puddle with filter paper and a funnel.
Filter.png

Key Stage 3

Meaning

Filtration is the process of separating a mixture of a liquid and an insoluble solid.

FiltrationDiagram.png
This diagram shows how the insoluble solid gets stuck in the filter paper and is called a Residue, while the liquid passes through the filter paper into the conical flask.

About Filtering

Only insoluble solids can be separated by filtering.
The solid trapped in the filter paper is called a residue.
The liquid that has passed through the filter paper is called filtrate.
Filtering uses a filter that has very small holes in it that allow the particles in the liquid through, but not the lumps of solid.
FiltrationParticleDiagram.png
This diagram shows how the insoluble solid gets stuck in the filter paper while the particles in the liquid are small enough to pass through the gaps in the filter paper.

Key Stage 4

Meaning

Filtration is the process of removing an insoluble solid from a mixture with a liquid.

About Filtration

In an experiment a mixture of insoluble solid and a liquid is filtered using filter paper. However, on an industrial scale many different types of filter can be used to separate insolubles solids from mixtures with liquids.

Filtration can only be used for:

Filtration cannot be used for:

References

AQA

Filtrate, pages 200-201, GCSE Biology; Student Book, Collins, AQA
Filtrates/filtration, page 8, GCSE Chemistry; Third Edition, Oxford University Press, AQA
Filtration (in kidneys), page 215, GCSE Biology, CGP, AQA
Filtration (Kidneys), page 75, GCSE Biology; The Revision Guide, CGP, AQA
Filtration, page 17, GCSE Chemistry; The Revision Guide, CGP, AQA
Filtration, page 23, GCSE Chemistry, Hodder, AQA
Filtration, page 37, GCSE Chemistry, CGP, AQA
Filtration, page 37, GCSE Combined Science Trilogy; Chemistry, CGP, AQA
Filtration, pages 137, 138, GCSE Combined Science Trilogy 1, Hodder, AQA
Filtration, pages 18, 144, 146-7, 263-4, 322, GCSE Chemistry; Student Book, Collins, AQA

Edexcel

Filtration, page 158, GCSE Biology, Pearson, Edexcel
Filtration, pages 101, 104, GCSE Combined Science; The Revision Guide, CGP, Edexcel
Filtration, pages 104, 112, GCSE Chemistry, CGP, Edexcel
Filtration, pages 150, 201, GCSE Combined Science, Pearson Edexcel
Filtration, pages 38, 41, GCSE Chemistry; The Revision Guide, CGP, Edexcel
Filtration, pages 6, 57, GCSE Chemistry, Pearson, Edexcel
Filtration; laboratory practice, page 151, GCSE Combined Science, Pearson Edexcel
Filtration; laboratory practice, page 7, GCSE Chemistry, Pearson, Edexcel

OCR

Filtration, pages 101, 148, Gateway GCSE Combined Science; The Revision Guide, CGP, OCR
Filtration, pages 28, 100, Gateway GCSE Chemistry; The Revision Guide, CGP, OCR
Filtration, pages 40, 42-43, 160, 198, 259, Gateway GCSE Chemistry, Oxford, OCR